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Archive for August, 2011

When to introduce the “Reasons Why”

The other day Richard Jackson asked Patrick Graupp – “When should I introduce the resaons why?”   We thought it was worth sharing the exchange with all our readers.  This question comes up  frequently in JI train the trainer sessions . 

 Richard said: “In session 2 When I am breaking down the Fire Underwriters’ Knot, I have always used the full JIB sheet on the board. I have included Reasons for Key Points. I know we are cramped for time here but I’ve thought that the Reasons are important enough to fit them in. I have still been able to meet the time markers pretty well. If Participants ask me why the Reasons column is not included in the Participant Guide, I tell them that the focus at that point is to get the Important Steps and Key Points. The reasons are really identified in the questioning to determine the Key Points. In other words, when we do a good job on identifying the key points, the Reasons pretty much fall out on their own. The Reasons are very important, but the focus at this point in the training is on getting the Important Steps and Key Points.

 What do you think? Should I just use the Important Steps and Key Points as shown in the manual and guide?”

 Patrick replied: “What I tell trainers here, in Session Two, is that FIRST the trainees need to learn what Important Steps and Key Points are before we get them focusing on reasons for Key Points. The reasons are a subset of the Key Points so if I don’t know what a Key Point is to begin with of course I won’t understand the reasons. So first things first, one at a time.

Like you said, though, we do find the reasons for the Key Points when we confirm, in the breakdown routine we teach in Session Two, if something can be a Key Point by asking why we do it that way or what would happen if we didn’t. So we’re not ignoring the reasons or leaving them out. But I don’t like to point these out, or put them on the board, until later in the course in Sessions Four or Five when breaking down the demonstration jobs. Doing this in Session Two would be giving them ‘more information than they can handle at one time.’

As you point out, the reasons for Key Points is one of most powerful parts of JI. We make full use of them in order to motivate workers to follow standard procedures because they know why they have to do the job that way. People will not do something that has “no meaning” (That is, there is no reason for doing it). So teach this part well by making sure they first understand Key Points and how to find them.”

What do you think?  Like this post? Let us know below.  Join the conversation – leave a comment.

Steve

TWI Summit Planning Begins! (May 16-17, 2012)

The TWI Institue and Lean Frontiers started working in earnest on the 2012 TWI Summit  http://www.twisummit.com/index.html.  This  Summit promises to be the best ever. We will have a mix of case studies with from 1 to 4 or more  years of implementation experience.    The Summit will offer pre-conference workshops, and  the ten hour classes of Job Instruction and Job Relations immediately following the Summit – Wednesday through Friday.     

The keynotes will also be outstanding (to be announced later) and the location is second to none. (Gaylord Palms, Orlando http://www.gaylordhotels.com/gaylord-palms/

This is the earliest we have been at this point in the planning for an upcoming Summit, so if you have any suggestions let Steve Grossman or Jim Huntzinger know (while we still have time ) at:  sgrossman@twi-institute.org  or jim@leanfront.com

Save the date!!

You can’t implement TWI without leadership

You can’t implement TWI without leadership.  Here is a great example of a leader who has a plan and is bringing everyone along – slowly and carefully – to realize a successful implementation.  James McDonald, Manager of Development & Training at Libbey agreed to share his message to the project team. I especially liked his sports analogy and his understanding that TWI programs are implemented by people using skills that must be developed through practice, over time. 

Good morning Team,

 I hope you had a good weekend and were able to stay out of the heat.   I don’t know about you, but my mental wheel was spinning over the weekend, reflecting on the training class and opportunities before us.  I really enjoyed the time I was able to spend with you.  We should feel privileged that we have the opportunity and responsibility for developing and executing this journey for our facility and company.

 As I stated in closing Friday, I likened last week and the upcoming weeks to a football team’s journey. 

 We’ve had our draft and you were selected.  It’s a privilege to be on the team.  We all have a very specific role on the team and we have to be accountable to the team and to each other.  We need to support, encourage and lift each other up.   Our team will only be as strong as the weakest link.

 We have just completed our initial meeting with our Head Coach (Pat Graupp) and have been shown the tools and skill sets (JI and JR) needed to win in our game of continual improvement.  These are our blocking and tackling fundamentals.   If we don’t stick to them, we’ll lose play by play and eventually lose in the game of Continual Improvement.  We were given a copy of these fundamentals to carry with us at all times.  [I will be asking to see your JR and JI cards anytime I see you!  🙂 ]

 Once we reviewed our blocking and tackling fundamentals, we then performed a number of walk-throughs showing how those fundamentals and techniques should be applied when running specific plays that we’ve run in the past (the jobs we brought in).   We asked questions and as we ran these plays, we saw where the new blocking and tackling techniques (JI and JR) reveal a lot of gaps on how we’ve done things in the past. No wonder we’re losing some games.

 I believe we see the need to change the way we’ve approached this game in the past and we’re committed to putting forth the time and energy to develop these skills and change the outcome of the game going forward.

 Now, we’re still not ready to play the regular season yet because we need to have more practices and play some exhibition games and we’ll be doing that over the next 1-3 weeks as follows:

  •  If you kept them – give your handwritten copies of the job breakdowns you did in the front of the class to your group leaders. I’ll stop by the group leaders and pick these up and will type them into our Libbey template.     
  •   Pick a 2nd small breakdown to perform over the next week.  I will type these up as well.
  •  Over the next 1-2 weeks, I will schedule these practice sessions with you through your manager and supervisor.   

 Finally, we will build a specific game-plan for each of the 3 pilot areas.  There will be more to come on this process.

James McDonald

Manager of Development & Training

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